Christopher Nolan earned $100 million from Oppenheimer

Christopher Nolan earned $100 million from Oppenheimer

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Director Christopher Nolanwho recently finally won his first director’s Oscar for the film “Oppenheimer”, received a little more 100 million dollars fee for the film adaptation of the story “father of the atomic bomb”.

This figure was made up of the salary, the director’s profit from the box office and a bonus for two Oscars – director’s and producer’s, writes Variety.

The budget of the film “Oppenheimer”, which received a total of seven Oscars, was 100 million dollars. Released on the big screens in July 2023, the biopic earned $958 million at the global box office.

Just as the documentary film “20 Days in Mariupol” is being released again in Ukraine after winning the Oscar, “Oppenheimer” will also be released again in cinemas around the world.

This will help it collect an even bigger box office and cross the $1 billion mark at the box office, which will give Nolan the right to receive an additional bonus. So the director’s profit from Oppenheimer’s film history can grow even more.

About the tape “Oppenheimer”

Film “Oppenheimer” was removed Christopher Nolan (“Inception”, “Interstellar”, “Dunkirk”) based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of the theoretical physicist, professor of the University of California at Berkeley, Robert Oppenheimer “American Prometheus”.

The tape tells the story of a scientist who, during the Second World War, headed the American secret program for the creation of nuclear weapons – the “Manhattan Project”.

The main roles in the biopic were played by Cillian Murphy (Robert Oppenheimer), Emily Blunt (Kitty Oppenheimer), Matt Damon (General Leslie Groves), Robert Downey Jr. (Lewis Strauss), Florence Pugh (Gene Tetlock) and other famous actors.

The tape was released together with another large-scale project – the comedy drama “Barbie” directed by Greta Gerwig. Because of this, the “Barbenheimer” meme arose.



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